Charles Fergus: Book Signing and Talk “Make a Home for Wildlife: Creating Habitat on Your Land, Backyard to Many Acres”

When:
April 25, 2019 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm
2019-04-25T18:00:00-04:00
2019-04-25T20:00:00-04:00
Where:
A.B. Ceder Room
80 Whitehall Rd
Litchfield, CT 06759
USA
Cost:
Free
Charles Fergus: Book Signing and Talk “Make a Home for Wildlife: Creating Habitat on Your Land, Backyard to Many Acres” @ A.B. Ceder Room | Litchfield | Connecticut | United States

Thursday, April 25, 2019

Make a Home for Wildlife helps property owners see their land in new ways and gives them the tools and knowledge to effectively improve food and cover for wildlife.

Whether you live on a quarter-acre lot in town, own a 20-acre woodland retreat, or belong to an outdoor or nature club with hundreds of acres, you can make changes to the land that will turn your property into a better habitat for wildlife.

Focusing on the eastern US from Canada to Florida, the book describes basic habitat types—forests, shrublands, grasslands, and wetlands—and how to create or improve them, along with specific recommendations for projects that will help many different kinds of wildlife, including birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians, butterflies, and pollinating insects. Fergus also relates inspiring stories of landowners who have transformed their properties into wonderful homes for local wildlife.

Author: Charles Fergus has published 17 books on nature and wildlife. He has written for publications as various as Audubon, Country Journal, Gray’s Sporting Journal, Yale Review, and the New York Times. He is a longtime columnist for Pennsylvania Game News magazine, and a communications consultant for the Wildlife Management Institute. He lives on a 120-acre hill farm in the Northeast Kingdom of Vermont, where he enjoys improving habitats to attract and support local wildlife.

6:00 p.m., A. B. Ceder Room, Book signing to follow in the Museum. Please pre-register by calling 860-567-0857 or register online.

FREE…Donations will be accepted to help defray the Conservation Center’s programming expenses